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Nurturing City Soils for Healthy Organic Vegetables

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Cover Slide for eOrganic Webinar

https://eorganic.org/node/35542

Video, Slides, and References

from Four 1 Hour Presentations

Moderated by eOrganic

  • Exploring Behaviors and Interventions to Reduce Soil Contaminant Exposure Among Community Gardeners and Farmers.
    Dr. Candis M. Hunter, Ph.D., MSPH, REH, Environmental Health Specialist.
  • Design And Management Strategies for Regenerating Healthy Soils Through Urban Agriculture.
    Dr. John Taylor, Associate Professor of Agroecology at the University of Rhode Island.
  • Combining Soil Amendments and Varietal Development to Prevent Pathogens and Heavy Metal Uptake.
    Dr. Lori Hoagland, Professor of Soil Microbial Ecology in the Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture at Purdue University.
  • Understanding Laboratory Soil Health Tests: Where Are We Now and Where Are We Going? 
    Dr. Roland Wilhelm, Assistant Professor of Soil Microbiology in the Department of Agronomy at Purdue University.
Each one of these excellent presentations features a national expert and focuses on a different aspect of working with urban soils. Content is targeted to gardeners, community gardeners, urban farmers, and anyone who works in these areas.

Urban farming can bring lots of benefits, but soils in cities can be degraded and, in some cases, contaminated. This can make vegetable crops more susceptible to pests and put farmers and gardeners at risk.

Learn to:

  • determine if their soils are contaminated
  • minimize risks while producing healthy, nutritious organic vegetables
  • restore degraded soils in cities
  • quantify whether their efforts are paying off.